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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a lot of the defensive sectors in the s&p 500 as you made note over in the past. we see a lot of the typically defensive sectors now trading at multiples two or three times above the larger broader markets, and actually that's worrying. >> tom: couldn't the kind of situation we're seeing on the eastern seaboard, though, the short term economic of the destruction that we're seeing -- forget the rebuilding for now. couldn't that lead to a more defensive stance on the parliament of shareholders? >> it could, but that would probably be to exit those markets or to enter more safe securities f. that were to be the case tomorrow, again, you would be headed to our staples neighborhoods rjs the dividend producing ighbhood and e exception of utilities given their hit in this storm. look, it's the end of the month. we've been off two days. tell be an interesting day to watch. >> tom: very interesting. do you wind up buying, though, if you see the initial reaction moving lower? i guess if you're moving away from defensive areas are you looking for growth and where are you going to find it
. that was not at the state level that was at the federal level. and that was primarily due to an increase in defense spending. i think that that was the biggest surprise and a pleasant surprise. >> brown: but on the other hand this is still very slow growth, right? >> yes, that's true. when youompare it to the, rt of theind of growth rate you should see for the economy at this stage of a recovery, it should be closer to 3%. we're the 2%. >> it looks as though a new area of weakness was in exports. what's going on there? >> yeah, there was clearly a slowdown, a negative number on expert-- exports. that is primarily due to the fact that we're doing less business with china. the economy of china has slowed. the economy of europe has slowed. and that showed up in the numbers. >> brown: i'm not going to me yointo a polical ansys but fro where youit does it look like there's something here for both candidates? >> yeah, i think there is something there for both sides. i think on the one side president obama can certainly point to the fact that the economy did better in the third quarter than it did in the second qu
dug himself into a hole and he felt there was about it -- >> word in defense of john sununu. he has laid out a formulation that colin powell should be proud supporting barack obama because they are of the semis, which means that, obvusly, john sununu, being white, is proud to be supporting mitt romney did john sununu is, believe me, and i've known him for a long time -- he is writing a new book called "dale carnegie was wrong," and it will not be a bestseller. [laughter] >> everybody has crazy uncles in the attic, and romney has john sununu, and he has donald trump, who is offering $5 million if the president will release -- >> he won't keep senate in the attic. -- sununi is in the attic. >> colby is right, they are putting him out regularly. they are not putting out stavridis or spokespersons that are not speaking with the unspoken. obama had a good line about, on the leno show. >> "it also g- all goes back when we were playing soccer in kenya." probably the best line i've heard the president delivered in the whole campaign. >> unfortunately, people out there will say, "c, i told y
: five points one way or the other? >> it could but -- they are playing defense on too many places. >> rose: i hear you. so the republicans are likely to win the house. >> keep the house. >> rose: boehner returns around the senate could go either way, according to late changes and specific races. there is ill hf a dozen or more specific races i defy anybody to tell you who is going to win them. >> rose: and nobody knows who is going to win the presidency. there is no strong argument, even though, even though people who and i am thinking specifically, specifically, of nate silver, who talks to me at the back end of this program, about if you look at the lead, who has the lead over, 70 percent, five percent of the time that person wisdom the election. that is looking at previous elections. >> here is something about all of the polls this cycle and here is why you have difference between the two candida campaigns and some of the public polls. who is going to vote? who is going to vote? the president is relying on low propensity voters, young voters, african-american voters, hispanic
as a country but we don't play defense very well. and that's the problem. even our own-- . >> rose: if are you playing defense you can lose one time and you have lost the game. >> precisely so they can do lots of things. and it's something that we as a country have to focus on, have to put resources into. i mean obviously this is the after smat of this hurricane is going to require lots of resoces too. but cyberterrorism is a reality. to know that people are doing things to out the world, you know, shutting down countries. we've seen for, we saw what happened in the ukraine with the russians doing it, kpon knowledge. >> rose: what is happening in mali right now a lot of other places. >> absolutely. so it's going to be the new frontier. it's going to be the new front in the war. >> rose: when you look at what you have had to do, what has been the hardest thing for you as being in charge of new yrk police. >> at inn this storm. >> rose: in response to this storm. >> well, you know, just the requirement of having a large numbers of police officers in the affected areas. we are shutting down or gr
like materials would do well, so we want to be not overweight the defensives. we want to play continued economic recovery. >> tom: looking for growth there, rob, how about it, is it on your buy list as well? >> you know, i'm not so sure i like overweighting technology at this point. it has come a long way. and i think it might take a little bit of a breather. consumer discretionaries i think should hold up prty well. materials, i like it i would actually for the first time in many years put a toe in the water in financial. i think you might see a little overperformance there, after the drama of the end of this year, beginning of 2-13 is behind us. might be a good opportunity to buy some of the things that get thrown out with the drama and fiscal cliff. >> a lot of those banks have been thrown out, certainly over the past several years. guys, we have to leave it there. a couple of market pros from the midwest, scott ren with wells fargo and rob stein withaser assetmanager. >> tom: sandy has brought some modes of transportation to a stand still across the mid- atlantic and northeastern u.
, low tas, big defense, had played itself out and that progressives, liberals, we were flat on our back. >> brown: you use this term hand making i implies a sense of craft, a hands-on. your own background i know from being involved in folklore and music. >> yes. i'm a folklorist and amuse i cannologist. that colors my perspective. i reach back for the foundation of my argument to the late 19th century, to that other transition, the industrial revolution, and the krettics who pushed back against it. and to the critics who pushed back against it. public intellectuals of the day who recognized the challenges of industrial production and the new reach of capitalism and really tried to present a vision of artisanship and craftsmanship as a kind of alternative. i touch rather lightly on them but i use them as a starting point. >> brown: if you use them and look at cultural problems and then like at the political divisiveness in the situation in politics today, how does it jibe? whatxact are u calling for? >> i think we need to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. if the reader
particularly highly compared to the economy and opportunities in education and defense and crime and things like that. but that's been declining over time. in fact, you unpack the environment section of what people care about, climate tends to rank virtually dead last. people are more concerned with their local environment: air pollution, water pollution, things like that. this is why we've seen these new poll-tested terms like "carbon pollution." c.o.-2 is the thing i'm exiling at you right now, we breathe out rbon dioxide. soe're seeing new terms called green energy instead of climate change because polls show people are skeptical and dubious of those motivations. they believe it's been overblown and it turns people off. >> suarez: joseph romm, why haven't we heard more about this topic during the national campaign? >> well, of course, mitt romney gets money from fossil fuel interests that's one reason he even opposes a clean energy tax credit for wind. obama, i think, is just misreading the polls entirely. the latest polling shows that -- i think ken is right. when global warming becomes
. flake. >> congressman flake has always been steadfast in his defense of americas free-enterprise system, in the idea that what makes america great and unique is that we have always championed economic liberty. >> reporter: campos also recorded a spanish language ad that alleges mr. carmona, who she has never met, has character problems. >> my information on his personality quirks has been what i have been told, what i have read in the newspapers and from a colleague of his who also did an ad recently. >> reporter: that tough television ad was made by carmona's former boss cristina beato on flake's behalf. it started running the same day early voting began. >> carmona is not who he seems. >> reporter: the carmona campaign dismissed the allegations as unfounded and countered with an ad featuring a retired female police captain who was carmona's swat team commander when he served as sheriffs deputy in pima county. >> congressman flake should be ashamed. >> reporter: because the race is so close, a single constituency or a single issue could make all the difference in the election. carmona
about what are you going to do about coastal cities, what sort of defenses will you put in place if you want to have a city like manhan that's right on the coast, it's at sea level. can we not have that many people living close to the sea. we have almost 4 million americans living a if few feet of high tide. is it right to be insuring that kind of property as well. we also have to think about climate change. we can argue endlessly really and scientists do over exactly how much climate change plays what role with weather. but we know enough to take steps to deal with it. we know enough to have a plan in place to reduce carbon emissions over time. we don't have absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country
. they burn houses, dwellings for civilians. >> warner: jeffrey white, a defense fellow at the washington institute for near east policy, says the syrian government is waging a deliberate "scorched earth" strategy. >> it's trying to get at f.s.a. units that are embedded inside the population. where people are, the f.s.a. tends to be. so it is trying to strike at the f.s.a., cause some attrition on them. but it's also trying to punish the people, the civilians, for supporting the f.s.a. the relationship between the f.s.a. units and the people is critical to the success of the rebelion >> warner: why don't the regime forces just go into these areas and take them and hold them? >> it basically can't do that any longer. six months ago, they could go anywhere in the country, effectively, they wanted with armor mechanized forces backed up by artillery, and simply push the f.s.a. out of the area and retake the area and reestablish a presence. the opposition is strong enough now that the regime's ground forces, to go into those areas, is a punishing affair for the regime. >> warner: throughout th
that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (crowd cheers) >> narrator: and when goldwater received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was always willing to live according to his principles. he didn't shy away from any challenge. he was a very strong person in doing that. and we learned that you have to live up to what you believe in. >> narrator: one thing george romney believed in was the vietnam war. and one year later, when mitt showed up at stanford university, he would adopt his father's position. >> so, he is very much on his father's side for the vietnam war at that time. he is really out of his element where the whole campus is being roiled by this anti-war and anti-establishment protest. >> narrator: mitt took on the protestors. >> mitt romney is a fairly rule-bound person. he actually protested the protestors. he held up a big sign that said, "go back to your studies." >> and we see the mitt romney who cares about rules and institutions and following orders. and that causes him to take a very dim view, i think, of the protest
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)